Home  »  Libya  »  UPDATE: WILL NOW NOT TESTIFY AT HEARING – Petraeus Resigns As CIA Chief On Eve Of Benghazi Hearing, Cites Extra-Marital Affair – READ RESIGNATION LETTER


Nov 9, 2012 Comments Off Pat Dollard


Petraeus and wife Holly, right.

SECOND AND MAJOR UPDATE: NEIL CAVUTO HAS JUST REPORTED (4:15 PM EST) THAT PETRAEUS WILL NOW NOT BE TESTIFYING AT NEXT WEEK’S BENGHAZI HEARING….CBS BACKS CAVUTO REPORT, PER NATIONAL REVIEW: CBS’ Mark Knoller tweets that “Senate Intelligence Committee says Petraeus will not testify at next week’s closed hearing on the events in Benghazi.”

Perhaps there is some protocol I’m unaware of, but I don’t see why resigning should affect whether Petraeus testifies or not. He was in charge of the CIA when the Benghazi attack occurred, and the CIA has been under plenty of fire for how the attack was handled.

FIRST UPDATE: Bret Baier is reporting live on Fox News television, at 3:27 PM Eastern, that he just spoke to Petraeus and Petraeus told him “The White House did not pressure me to do this.”….developing…

FIRST POST: Notice he did it before he is scheduled to testify at next week’s closed-door Benghazi hearing…and notice how NBC Reporter/Obama Operative Andrea Mitchell has a completed report before anyone else. I wonder how long he kept this secret, leaving himself vulnerable to blackmail…developing…

By Andrea Mitchell and Robert Windrem, NBC News: CIA Director David Petraeus resigned Friday, citing an extramarital affair and “extremely poor judgement.”

Multiple sources tell NBC News that Mike Morrell, the deputy CIA director and a longtime CIA officer, would likely be offered the job as acting director but with the understanding that he may be elevated to the job permanently at some point.

That’s how George Tenet got the job, first as deputy director in July 1995, then acting director following the resignation of John Deutch in December 1996 and finally as director in July 1997, staying on in the Bush Administration.

Morrell is a longtime CIA analyst and was an eyewitness to two of the most momentous events in recent U.S. history. He was traveling with President George W. Bush on Sept. 11, 2001, as the president’s briefer, and was in the Situation Room on May 1, 2011, as deputy CIA Director, when Navy SEALs killed Osama bin Laden.
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Here is Petraeus’ resignation letter:

HEADQUARTERS Central Intelligence Agency

9 November 2012
Yesterday afternoon, I went to the White House and asked the President to be allowed, for personal reasons, to resign from my position as D/CIA. After being married for over 37 years, I showed extremely poor judgment by engaging in an extramarital affair. Such behavior is unacceptable, both as a husband and as the leader of an organization such as ours. This afternoon, the President graciously accepted my resignation.

As I depart Langley, I want you to know that it has been the greatest of privileges to have served with you, the officers of our Nation’s Silent Service, a work force that is truly exceptional in every regard. Indeed, you did extraordinary work on a host of critical missions during my time as director, and I am deeply grateful to you for that.

Teddy Roosevelt once observed that life’s greatest gift is the opportunity to work hard at work worth doing. I will always treasure my opportunity to have done that with you and I will always regret the circumstances that brought that work with you to an end.
Thank you for your extraordinary service to our country, and best wishes for continued success in the important endeavors that lie ahead for our country and our Agency.

With admiration and appreciation,
David H. Petraeus


Vice President Joe Biden, right, administers the oath of office to Dir. of the CIA David Petraeus, center, during a swearing-in ceremony in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, Sept., 6, 2011. Holding a Bible is Petraeus’ wife Holly Knowlton Petraeus, left. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)


CNN TIMELINE OF EVENTS AND REACTIONS:

[Updated at 3:59 p.m.] Sen. Dianne Feinstein, the head of the Senate Intelligence Committee, said, “I wish President Obama had not accepted this resignation, but I understand and respect the decision.”

The California Democrat praised Petraeus for giving the CIA “leadership, stature, prestige and credibility both at home and abroad,” calling him reliably in “command of intelligence issues” and “especially cooperative with Congress.”

[Updated at 3:53 p.m.] The chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee praised outgoing CIA Director David Petraeus, saying, “I regret his resignation and wish him and his family the very best.”

“Gen. Petraeus is one of America’s most outstanding and distinguished military leaders and a true American patriot,” said Rep. Peter King, a Republican from New York.

[Updated at 3:41 p.m.] David Petraeus met with President Barack Obama on Thursday, at which time the then CIA director offered his resignation, a senior administration official said. The president then formally accepted Petraeus’ resignation in a phone call Friday afternoon, according to the same official.

[Updated at 3:38 p.m.] President Obama said, in a statement, that today he accepted Petraeus’ resignation as CIA director.

The president added he is “completely confident that the CIA will continue to thrive and carry out its essential mission,” now under the leadership of Acting Director Michael Morrell.

Obama lauded Petraeus for his “extraordinary service to the United States for decades,” calling him “one of the outstanding general officers of his generation” and praising his work as CIA director.

The president concluded by saying, “Going forward, my thoughts and prayers are with Dave and Holly Petraeus, who has done so much to help military families through her own work. I wish them the very best in this difficult time.” Holly Petraeus led the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s Office for Servicemembers Affairs.

[Updated at 3:17 p.m.] Shortly before Petraeus’ resignation was announced, White House press secretary Jay Carney told reporters that “the president thinks Gen. Petraeus has done an excellent job.”

When asked about the general’s job status, Carney reiterated that President Obama approves of the job done by the CIA director while adding, “I don’t have personnel announcements to make from here today.”

[Updated at 3:13 p.m.] Petraeus issued a statement announcing his resignation, saying, “After being married for over 37 years, I showed extremely poor judgment by engaging in an extramarital affair.

“Such behavior is unacceptable, both as a husband and as the leader of an organization such as ours. This afternoon, the president graciously accepted my resignation.”

[Initial post, 3:08 p.m.] CIA Director David Petraeus submitted his resignation Friday to President Barack Obama, citing personal reasons, a U.S. government source said.

According to the source, Petraeus admitted to having an extramarital affair when he asked to resign.

A retired U.S. Army general who served as the top U.S. commander in Iraq and Afghanistan, Petraeus was sworn in as the head of the CIA in September 2011.

Director of National Intelligence James Clapper issued a statement Friday confirming that Petraeus had turned in his resignation, saying his “decision to step down represents the loss of one of our nation’s most respected public servants.”