Home  »  Terror  »  Boko Haram Violence Against Christians Moves Nigeria to No. 7 On List of Terror-Affected Nations


Dec 7, 2012 No Comments ›› Infidel

(CNSNews.com) – Boko Haram’s violent jihad against Christians in Nigeria pushed the West African country into seventh place in annual rankings of countries impacted by terrorism, lending weight to calls for the State Department to reconsider its decision not to designate the group as a “foreign terrorist organization.”

Nigeria’s ranking in the latest Global Terrorism Index, released this week, marked a shift from 12th place a year earlier, from 16th place in 2008, and from 30th place in 2005. The top six countries this year are Iraq, Pakistan, Afghanistan, India, Yemen and Somali.

Produced by the Institute for Economics and Peace, the index is calculated based on the number of terrorist incidents, the number of deaths, the number of casualties and the level of property damage. The four indicators are used to create a weighted five-year average that takes into account the lasting effects of terrorism.

The newly-published rankings relate to 2011, a year during which 168 terror attacks were recorded in Nigeria, accounting for 437 deaths and 614 injuries.

This year, however, has already witnessed more than 700 Nigerian Christian deaths in Boko Haram-related violence, according to the Christian Association of Nigerian-Americans (CANAN), a group formed in New York last September. The looming Christmas period could well bring more, if past years are a guide.

Most recently, ten Christians were reported to have been killed last Saturday after suspected Boko Haram attackers set alight houses and knifed inhabitants in a mostly Christian part of a village in Nigeria’s far north-western Borno state. Three days later attackers in another northern state, Kano, shot dead two policemen and threw homemade bombs at a bus, wounding several people.

On Thursday a government agency reported that 27 schools in two northern states had been destroyed in recent Boko Haram attacks, the Lagos daily Guardian reported. Non-Muslim schools are a key target for the group, whose name roughly translates “Western education is forbidden.”

CANAN has joined appeals for the State Department to designate Boko Haram as an FTO.

Despite the escalating violence the administration has resisted the calls, although it did name three Boko Haram individuals last June under an executive order designed to disrupt funding to terrorists. Republican lawmakers who have been pressing for FTO designation, including Homeland Security Committee chairman Rep. Peter King (R-N.Y.), called the step inadequate.

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