Home  »  Law Enforcement  »  WATCH, AFTERMATH LIVE STREAM: Second Boston Jihadi Captured Alive After Shootout


Apr 18, 2013 Comments Off Pat Dollard

Boghosian_Suspects8_MET_2

2013-04-19T235444Z_01_WAT451_RTRMDNP_3_USA-EXPLOSIONS-BOSTON-SURROUNDED

ALL NEWS AGENCIES ARE REPORTING THAT HE HAD BEEN TAKEN ALIVE, AND IS IN AN AMBULANCE, WATCH THE LIVE STREAM FOR DETAILS

Great Local/National Fox Live Stream:

4:47 P.M. PST Cops are now sending in a robot toward boat due to fears he is wearing a suicide vest…

4:44 PM PST: Boston Globe says this, but others say, yes, they removed the tarp, but he’s still moving and refusing to come out…we are checking it all out:

UPDATE, 4:43 PM PST: JUST HEARD WITH MY OWN EARS LOCAL FOX QUOTE THE POLICE SAYING THEY SEE HIM DOWN, BUT STILL MOVING, HE IS ENTIRELY CORNERED AND SURROUNDED, HIDING IN A BOAT IN SOMEONE’S BACK YARD…WATCH ANY LIVE STREAM BELOW…DEVELOPING…

BREAKING UPDATE ‘SUSPECT IS DOWN': Update, 7:04 p.m. EST: Fox News and others are reporting “more than 20 shots” fired in Watertown. Police source says a suspect is down.

FOX NEWS: The second suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing is believed to be “down” after gunfire broke out in the Watertown section of Boston moments after state and local officials said their hunt had come up dry Friday.

Sources told Fox News a suspect was down. A neighbor described the sound of multiple shots as akin to “a roll of firecrackers shooting off,” and blood was found on or near a boat at a home on Franklin Street.

“All hell broke loose,” the neighbor told a MyFox Bosto reporter.

LIVE STREAM COVERAGE:

Watch live streaming video from necn_live at livestream.com



Stream videos at Ustream

CLICK HERE FOR NAMES AND INTEL ON BOMBERS

Boston Globe
— Police have surrounded a home and car in Watertown as part of a massive manhunt for one of the suspects for one of the suspects in the deadly Boston Marathon terror bombing attacks. The standoff comes after a chaotic, violent night in which a second suspect died in a confrontation with police, and one police officer was killed and another seriously wounded.

Authorities are searching for Dzhokhar A. Tsarnaev, 19, a government official said this morning. The dead suspect is his brother, a separate source said.

At 8:45 a.m., a SWAT team and armored car had been summoned and police were surrounding a home and a car near an intersection in Watertown, the community that officials said is the focus of their search for the surviving suspect.

“They’re pointed across the street. Guns are pointed across the street. There have been hundreds of cops here throughout the day,” said Natalie, a resident of Willow Park, who declined to give her last name.

Governor Deval Patrick asked people who live in the entire city of Boston, as well as the nearby communities of Watertown, Waltham, Newton, Belmont, Cambridge, to “shelter in place” — stay inside and not open their doors to anyone, except police with proper identification.

The search has also led to the sudden shutdown of the MBTA’s entire network of commuter rail, bus, and subway services. Taxi service was shut down. And officials requested businesses across the area not to open this morning.

“This is a serious situation. We’re taking it seriously,” Patrick said at an 8 a.m. media briefing in Watertown.

The night of chaos began Thursday night just hours after law enforcement released images of two suspects in the bombings at the Boston Marathon finish line Monday afternoon that left three people dead and more than 170 wounded.

The Associated Press reported this morning that the second suspect’s name is Tamerlan Tsarnaev. .The Globe has learned that the two are brothers.

A law enforcement source told the Globe that an explosive trigger was found on Tamerlan Tsarnaev’s body at the morgue.

MIT Police Officer Sean Collier, 26, of Somerville was killed and MBTA Transit Police Officer Richard H. Donahue Jr., 33, was wounded. About 20 officers from Watertown and other departments were being evaluated at St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center in Brighton early this morning, according to a source, who said the officers said they were hurt from grenades being thrown from the window of a car during a car chase. The source did not have information about where the officers were from or the nature of their injuries.

Most of the region’s universities — including Harvard, MIT, Boston University, Boston College, Northeastern, and Suffolk — announced that they would be closed for the day.

The MBTA’s announcement that it was suspending service left people stranded at T stops and stations across Eastern Massachusetts. Highways were jammed with commuters.

“People at bus or subway stations, we are asking them to go home,’’ Schwartz said. “We do not want people congregating and waiting for the system to come back on.’’

It was not known when the MBTA service would resume.

“We believe these are the same individuals that were responsible for the bombing Monday at the Marathon,’’ Colonel Timothy Alben, commander of the State Police, said today. “We believe that they are responsible for the death of an MIT police officer and the shooting of an MBTA police officer. This is a very serious situation that we are dealing with.’’

Boston Police Commissioner Edward F. Davis this morning said Suspect No. 2 is the person being sought by a massive collection of federal, state, and municipal police. He is believed to be the suspect who actually dropped the bombs at the race finish line.

“We believe this to be a terrorist,’’ Davis told reporters about 4:30 a.m. today. “We believe this to be a man here to kill people.”

Police warned residents in East Watertown to stay in their homes, and not to answer the door unless they see a uniformed police officer outside. They said drivers should not stop in the area roughly bounded by Dexter, Laurel, and Arsenal streets.

According to Alben, the night’s outbreak of violence began when police received reports of a robbery of a convenience store in Kendall Square near MIT. A few minutes later, an MIT police officer, who has not been identified, was shot multiple times while in his cruiser at Main and Vassar streets, near Building 32, better known as the renowned Stata Center on the MIT campus.

The officer was pronounced dead at Massachusetts General Hospital. A short time later, two men carjacked a Mercedes SUV at gunpoint, and the owner of that car was able to flee at a gas station on Memorial Drive.

The SUV proceeded out Memorial Drive toward Watertown followed by a long train of police vehicles in pursuit. At one point during the pursuit, the two suspects opened fire on Watertown police and Donahue, the Transit Police officer, was shot. He remains in stable condition at Mt. Auburn Hospital, the hospital said this morning.

During the gunfight, Suspect No. 1 was wounded and was taken into custody. This morning, Dr. Richard Wolfe said the man was brought to the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center emergency room about 1:10 a.m. with multiple traumatic injuries.

“It was more than gunshot wounds,’’ Wolfe told reporters about 5:30 a.m. today. “It was a combination of injuries. We believe a combination of of blasts, multiple gunshot wounds.”

Wolfe said it looked like the man had been hurt by an “explosive device’’ and that the man was struck by “shrapnel.’’ The man was pronounced dead at 1:35 a.m. The hospital officials said they did not know his name.

In Watertown, gunfire and explosions cut through the night air. Police warned that spectators were in danger. At Arsenal Court and Arsenal Street in Watertown, an officer bellowed: “Ya gotta get outta here. There’s an active shooter here with an active explosive. Go!”

Peter Jennings, 33, said he was sleeping just before 1 a.m. in his home on Prentiss Street when he was awakened by a huge boom.

“It sounded like a stick of dynamite went off,” he said. “I looked out the window, and it was like nothing I’ve ever seen — blue light after blue light after blue light.”

He said more than three dozen emergency vehicles were heading down Route 16 West. He went to the end of his street, where some neighbors were gathering. The air, he said, smelled like “at the end of a fireworks show, like a wick smell.”

“I had a bad feeling because of what happened on Monday,” he said.

Adam Healy, 31, said he stepped outside for a cigarette near one of the shooting scenes in Watertown, when he heard gunfire.

“I just heard tons of gunshots,” he said. “Gunshot, gunshot, gunshot, gunshot. Then I saw an explosion and saw a burst of light in the sky.”

Imran Saif, a cab driver, was parking his car for the night near Dexter and School streets and was preparing to bike home to Cambridge when he heard a series of loud noises that he said “sounded like fireworks.”

He said he biked toward the sounds, thinking they were fireworks, when people in nearby houses began waving him back, telling him it was gunfire.

“It just sounded like there was automatic weapons going off, and I heard a few explosions,” he said. “They sounded like fireworks, mostly, big fireworks going off — tons, I’d say. I’m really scared. When I found out it was gunshots, that just knocked the wind out of me.”

Dan MacDonald, who lives on Bigelow Avenue and Mount Auburn Street, near Watertown Square, said he was watching TV and talking with his girlfriend when they began hearing sirens — just a few at first, then more — “maybe five or seven, racing at this point.”

Then in the distance they heard gunshots, about 15, he said, within 10 seconds. “I kind of ran downstairs and came outside,” he said. “They were coming from the Arsenal Street area up Bigelow Avenue. There were about 10 cop cars, they took a left on Mount Auburn Street heading toward Galen Street.”

At Mass. General, family members of the MIT police who was fatall shot declined to comment. About a dozen gathered outside the hospital’s emergency room, hugging and consoling one another through the night.

Early today, MIT issued a statement about the death of the officer. “MIT is heartbroken by the news that an MIT Police officer was shot and killed in the line of duty on Thursday night on campus. Our thoughts are now with the family.”

BOSTON POLICE SCANNER: MIKE MULUGETA IS DEAD

WATERTOWN, Mass. - A tense night of police activity just days after the Boston Marathon bombings caused police to converge on a neighborhood outside Boston where explosives and gunfire were heard.

The chaos in Watertown, about 10 miles west of Boston, occurred just hours after a Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer was shot and killed on campus.

CBS News has learned a suspect was taken to a hospital and is dead. Boston Police Commissioner Edward Davis tweeted that a second suspect as at large — the one seen in the white hat in images released by the FBI Thursday of the Boston Marathon suspects. Davis says he is “armed and dangerous.”


BOSTON GLOBE:
WATERTOWN — One suspect in Monday’s Boston Marathon bombings has been captured, according to an official with knowledge of the investigation. Another remains on the loose in Watertown after a firefight with police. Authorities have established a 20-block perimeter as they search for him.

A scene of chaos descended on Cambridge and Watertown late Thursday night and early Friday morning, as police confirmed an MIT police officer was shot and killed, and an apparent carjacking led police on a wild chase into Watertown.

Witnesses in Watertown said they heard explosions. Police officers were screaming about improvised explosive devices.

Authorities would not comment on whether the events were connected to Monday’s Boston Marathon bombings. At least one of the suspects in Watertown appeared to be a man in his 20s.

FBI agents were on the scene in Watertown.

“We are aware of the situation, we are being involved, and we are monitoring,” said an FBI representative who requested anonymity because of not being authorized to speak publicly. The FBI source said early Friday it is “too early to speculate” on a relation to the Marathon bombing.

Dozens of police officers descended on Watertown Square after midnight.

“This is still extremely dangerous,” an FBI agent said. The Cambridge bomb squad arrived in Watertown shortly after 1:30 a.m.

A man in handcuffs was being questioned by the FBI in the back of an ambulance.

At Arsenal Court and Arsenal Street in Watertown, an officer bellowed: “Ya gotta get outta here. There’s an active shooter here with an active explosive. Go!”

Peter Jennings, 33, said he was sleeping just before 1 a.m. in his home on Prentiss Street in Watertown when he was awakened by a huge boom.

“It sounded like a stick of dynamite went off,” he said. “I looked out the window, and it was like nothing I’ve ever seen – blue light after blue light after blue light.”

He said more than three dozen emergency vehicles with sirens blaring were heading down Rt. 16 West. He went to the end of his street, where some neighbors were gathering. The air, he said, smelled like “at the end of a fireworks show, like a wick smell.”

“I had a bad feeling because of what happened on Monday,” he said.

John Antonucci’s 79-year-old mother called him hysterical from her home in Laurel Street. She heard about five gun shots and didn’t know what to do.

“She was saying they’re running down the street shooting,” Antonucci said standing outside if yellow police tape. “She was crying so hard I couldn’t understand what she was talking about.”

So he told her: Stay inside the house.

Residents describe the neighborhood as safe and family oriented, where they leave open doors and windows and feed stray cats.

Standing on the corner of Quincy and Nichols as police officers hastily strung up caution tape, Lindsay Gaylord, 25, and Collin Ausfeld, 26, peered over the scene to get a glimpse of their apartment about a block away on Dartmouth Street.

“I was buying ice cream right there” — Gaylord pointed to a structure a few steps away, behind the caution tape “just this afternoon.”

Ausfeld stared at the crime scene in front of him, trying to make sense of what he was seeing. As an afterthought, he muttered, “I hope the apartment doesn’t blow up.”

The couple said they moved to the neighborhood in January, leaving behind their Belmont place, because Watertown was closer to the city, and their block was quiet, safe, and friendly.

“After this, I still feel safe on this street,” Gaylord said. “I mean, you just never know with these things.”

Adam Healy, 31, said he stepped outside for a cigarette near one of the shooting scenes in Watertown, when he heard gunfire.

“I just heard tons of gunshots,” he said. “Gunshot, gunshot, gunshot, gunshot. Then I saw an explosion and saw a burst of light in the sky.”

Imran Saif, a cab driver, was parking his car for the night near Dexter and School streets and was preparing to bike home from Cambridge when he heard a series of loud noises that he said “sounded like fireworks.” He said he biked toward the sounds, thinking they fireworks, when people in nearby houses began waving him back, telling him it was gunfire.

“It just sounded like there was automatic weapons going off, and I heard a few explosions,” he said. “They sounded like fireworks, mostly, big fireworks going off — tons, I’d say. I’m really scared. When I found out it was gunshots, that just knocked the wind out of me.”

Police were demanding that cellphones be turned off.

The MIT officer, who has not been identified, was shot multiple times at 10:48 p.m., according to the Middlesex district attorney’s office. No one else was hurt, and no ­arrests had been made by early Friday.

The manhunt fanned out from ­Kendall Square over an area that has endured a tragic and tumultuous week, in the aftermath of the fatal explosions at Monday’s Boston Marathon. There was no report of a connection between the two events, but the swarm of sirens and circling helicopters rattled a region already on edge.

Police from several agencies were conducting a manhunt for the gunman across the school campus and on the T’s Red Line, according to authorities.

MIT and Cambridge police responded to a report of shots fired at 10:48 p.m. Thursday near Main and Vassar streets, according to the university.

Police officers and canine units swept the campus, and a big swath of Vassar Street was blocked.

The university issued an alert to students and faculty to remain inside.

An eerie quiet descended on the campus as teams of ­police officers combed the campus block by block. SWAT teams were present.

Police checked bushes and alleys and yanked on doors.

Officers from the MIT and Harvard departments, as well as Cambridge and State Police, were present.

Siddhartha Varshney was walking home from dinner with two friends when they were stopped at the police cordon.

“Initially, we thought they had caught the suspect in the bombing,” the 28-year-old said. But they then learned it was a shooting involving an MIT officer.

“Well, I — honestly — I mean, I can’t think what I make of it. The situation is a little tense,” he said. “And I hope that whoever he is gets caught.”

Few seemed to be out on the campus at the time of the shooting. One professor, standing feet from the police tape, said he came out of his office when he heard a commotion of sirens and saw ­police lights.

At around midnight, a frantic scene was unfolding at Massachusetts General Hospital, where a dozen police cars arrived with sirens on and several women were brought in by police, looking deeply ­upset.

Related: BREAKING: Police Officer Shot And Killed On MIT Campus Near Boston – Search On For Suspect(s)

It appears this is the terrorists as they tried and failed to escape the city – one is in custody

UPDATE: PER WCVB AN OFFICER HAS BEEN SHOT HERE IN WATERTOWN – THAT’S TWO OFFICERS SHOT TONIGHT, INCLUDING THE ONE IN CAMBRIDGE. RIGHT NOW A ROBOT IS ATTEMPTING TO REMOVE AN IED-LIKE DEVICE FROM MIDDLE OF STREET.

WATERTOWN, Mass. —NewsCenter 5’s Sean Kelly reported shots fired and explosive devices being detonated in Watertown.

The scene was located on Dexter Street in Watertown.

Police are urging everyone to stay inside of their homes. The area is considered extremely dangerous.

There is one suspect who is reported to be in custody. Another suspect remains on the loose, in what is described as a very active scene.

The suspects are reportedly connected to a carjacking that took place in the Cambridge

No additional information was immediately available.

Click here to listen to Boston Police scanner
p