#MH370 TERROR Investigation Heats Up As Suspect List Rises To 4, Signs Emerge Plane Tried To Turn Around – See Photos Of The Oil Slicks Off Vietnam
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Mar 9, 2014 Comments Off Chuck Biscuits

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Related: SIGNS OF TERROR EMERGE IN FLIGHT #MH370 CRASH: Two Passengers Used Stolen Passports To Board

Excerpted from DAILY MAIL: Fears that missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH307 may have been taken down by terrorists were heightened today after authorities confirmed four passengers are now under investigation.

It comes as the chief of the Malaysian Air Force said that radar indicated the missing plane may have turned back before it crashed.

Malaysian Security officials earlier revealed they had footage of two passengers traveling on passports stolen in Thailand – one registered to an Italian and the other an Austrian – making their way through Kuala Lumpur passport control to the aircraft.

Malaysian security officers say they are currently verifying the identities of the two new people in question with the relevant embassies, but refused to elaborate further.

The passengers being checked had all bought their tickets through China Southern Airlines.

It follows reports that an anonymous pilot told Malaysian newspapers that he had heard a mumbled last transmission from the aircraft – although this is contradicted by air traffic controllers who say there was no distress call.

U.S. officials also confirmed they have dispatched a team of safety experts including FBI agents to Southeast Asia to assist in the investigation of the Boeing 777, which disappeared shortly after takeoff with 239 people on board.

While the wreckage of the plane has still not been found, new photos of oil slicks in the South China Sea have emerged and a growing body of evidence is beginning to point towards a terrorist attack.

And dramatically, a second pilot who was in the skies over the South China Sea when the 777 vanished has spoken about hearing ‘mumbling’ at the other end of communications with the plane.

The captain, who asked to remain anonymous, told Malaysian media outlets he was asked to get in contact with the pilot flying the missing plane on an emergency frequency and establish their position.

He said he believes he spoke to the co-pilot, but that there were ‘interference’ and ‘mumbling’ before they lost the connection.

Earlier on Saturday, two oil slicks were spotted by the Vietnamese air force in the Gulf of Thailand, about 90 miles south of Vietnam’s Tho Chu Island – the same area where the flight disappeared from radar.
An aerial view of an oil spill is seen from a Vietnamese Air Force aircraft in the search area for a missing Malaysia Airlines plane

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An aerial view of an oil spill is seen from a Vietnamese Air Force aircraft in the search area for a missing Malaysia Airlines plane

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This oil slick was found in the Gulf of Thailand, about 90 miles south of Vietnam’s Tho Chu Island – the same area where the flight disappeared from radar early Saturday morning

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An aerial view of what is believed to be an oil slick aircraft stretching a length of about 80 km in the sea off the Vietnamese coast. Investigators are trying to determine whether there is a link between the slick and the missing 777

The plane – carrying 227 passengers and 12 crew members – took off from Kuala Lumpur at 12.21am (4.21pm GMT) Saturday bound for Beijing, where it was expected to land at 6.30am (10.30pm GMT).

But after reaching 35,000ft and 120 nautical miles off the coast of the Malaysian town of Kota Bharu the plane vanished.

IBM employee Philip Wood, 51, was identified as the only adult passenger traveling on a U.S. passport on Flight MH307.

Two other American travelers have been named as toddlers Leo Meng, 2, and Nicole Meng, 4.

IBM employee Philip Wood, 51, was identified as the only adult passenger traveling on a U.S. passport on Flight MH307.

Two other American travelers have been named as toddlers Leo Meng, 2, and Nicole Meng, 4.

After almost 24 hours, mystery still surrounds what happened to the aircraft, with Malaysian officials saying they are not ruling anything out.

Causing the most suspicion are the two confirmed stolen passports and the new people being investigated.

Luigi Maraldi, 27, was listed as the sole Italian national on the missing flight, but according to his father, was not on the plane.

‘Luigi called us early this morning to reassure us he was fine, but we didn’t know about the accident,’ Walter Maraldi told NBC News. ‘Thank God he heard about it before us.’

The name of Austrian citizen Christian Kozel, 30, also appeared on the passenger manifest, but the European nation’s foreign ministry stated that the man was safe back home, and that his passport had been stolen.

Officials from Italy and Austria confirmed that the travel documents of both men were reported stolen in Thailand. The Austrian passport was taken two years ago, and the Italian one last year.

A list of passenger names posted at the Beijing airport, apparently by Chinese authorities, listed three U.S. passport holders: Philip Tallmadge Wood, 51; Nicole Meng, 4; and Leo Meng, 2.

Wood is believed to be an IBM technical storage executive who began working in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, only three months ago, according to his LinkedIn profile.

The two Canadian passengers were identified as mining executive Muktesh Mukherjee and his wife Xiaomo Bai.

What may have caused the Malaysian Airlines plane to disappear

The most dangerous parts of a flight are takeoff and landing. Incidents rarely happen when midflight.

The disappearance of a Malaysia Airlines jet well into its flight has led experts to assume that whatever happened was quick and left the pilots no time to make a distress call.

It initially appears there was either a sudden breakup of the plane or something that led it into a quick, steep dive. Some experts even suggested an act of terrorism.

Possible causes for a crash include:

Catastrophic structural failure This could have damaged the airframe or engines. Given the plane’s impressive safety record, experts suggest this is unlikely.

Bad weather Planes are designed to fly though most severe storms, but poor weather has caused crashes in the past. However, the skies were clear in this case.

Pilot disorientation The pilots could have taken the plane off autopilot and somehow gone course.

Failure of both engines In January 2008, a British Airways 777 crashed about 1,000 feet short of the runway at London’s Heathrow Airport. There were no fatalities. Such a scenario is possible, but the plane could glide for up to 20 minutes, giving pilots plenty of time to make an emergency call.

A bomb Several planes have been brought down by bombs. If the debris field is large it will indicate the plane broke apart high up.

Hijacking A traditional hijacking seems unlikely given that a plane’s captors typically land at an airport and have some type of demand. But a 9/11-like hijacking is possible, with terrorists forcing the plane into the ocean.

Pilot suicide There were two large jet crashes in the late 1990s that investigators suspected were caused by pilots deliberately crashing.

Accidental shoot-down There have been two previous cases of passenger jets being brought down accidentally by the military. Keep Reading